Reuse, reuse, reuse. And when you can’t reuse – recycle with Oxfam

 

In the UK, 11 million items of clothing go to landfill every week. It’s an alarming trend that’s harming our planet. But we can all do a little bit to help.

If we all donate our unwanted clothes to charity, instead of chucking them in the bin, we’d save an estimated 300,000 tonnes of textiles from going to landfill every year. And just think of the money that those items could raise for great causes.

When you donate clothes to Oxfam, they could go a lot further than your local Oxfam shop. We’ve been recycling clothes since 1974 when Wastesaver – our textiles recycling centre – first opened its doors. It’s the only one of its kind. And where your clothes could go to continue their journey if they don’t sell. Our team of second hand experts are on hand, ready to sort through your donations to decide on the best possible place for them to go.

  • Items that stand out, like a sparkly jumpsuit or denim jacket, could end up in one of our festival shops or in Oxfam’s online shop.
  • And as for your jeans, t-shirts or any items that are too worn out to be rehomed, they might be sold to be turned into industrial cleaning cloth, mattress filling or carpet underlay. All raising money to help beat poverty.
  • Your old bras and summer clothing could be sent on to Frip Ethique – an Oxfam-run social enterprise in Senegal. Most of the workers are women, who sort and sell clothes donated to Oxfam to local market traders. It’s a great way for them to earn a living which means they can afford healthcare and send their children to school.
  • We’ve also got a team of super crafty volunteers, who handpick items to upcycle before they’re sold. They’ve been known to transform doilies into bunting, blankets into bags and pom poms into jackets.

Wherever your clothes end up, we’re proud to say it certainly won’t be in landfill.

So if you’re about to have an end of summer sort-out – help people and planet by bagging up what you can’t reuse and pop it down to your local Oxfam shop.

 

 

Photo credit: Bekki Frost/Oxfam

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